The Ohio High School Athletic Association

Sports Safety

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TOPICS:

Concussion Resources

Heat Illness Information and Resources

Communicable Diseases

Medical Hardware

Sports Eye Safety


Concussion Resources

It is important to take the necessary precautions to reduce the likelihood of brain and spinal injuries in football and other sports.  

Concussion Resources

Concussion Feature Articles


Heat Illness Information & Resources
As summer programs begin and pre-season approaches, coaches, parents, and athletes should be reminded to stay properly hydrated.  This means drinking when you may not feel thirsty and avoiding carbonated or sugar-laden beverages!   Heat illnesses can be life threatening.  Be aware and be prepared.  Be familiar with the “Heat Illnesses: Signs, Symptoms, & What to Do” chart and be sure to follow the advice of your athletic trainers and team physicians about exercising in the heat and humidity. 

Communicable Diseases
While the risk of contracting many communicable diseases maybe minimal to non existent (ex: HIV/AIDS) others are more prevalent (ex: staph infections) in athletic competition, it is important to take the necessary precautions to reduce transmission potential.

Medical Hardware

OHSAA Statement on Medical Hardware
Unless the specific rules code stipulates otherwise, athletes in sports of a collision/contact nature should not be permitted to wear devices such as insulin pumps, heart monitoring equipment and/or other diagnostic or therapeutic appliances while participating in interscholastic contests. 

However, in the event that a physician requires a student-athlete to wear a therapeutic device during competition, such medical necessity shall be specified in writing and signed by the prescribing physician, and the device shall be padded and securely attached to the player’s body underneath the uniform.  The medical statement shall be shown to the head contest official prior to the athlete’s being permitted to participate.

Sports Eye Safety
Every year, hospital emergency departments throughout the country treat over 45,000 sports-related and recreational eye injuries. More than half are suffered by players under 18.

Eye injuries are often the result of a high-speed ball, aggressive body contact or a moving piece of sports equipment.  Young players often lack the reflexes, coordination, strength or experience to avoid these eye hazards.

When properly fitted, appropriate eye protection can reduce the risk of eye injuries by at least 90 percent.

Your league can get free protective equipment through the Ohio Ophthalmological Society's Play Hard. Don't Blink. sports eye safety program.  For more information about the Play Hard. Don't Blink. program visit our website by clicking here (link) or by going to www.playhardgear.com

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